The Unapologetic Mathematician

Mathematics for the interested outsider

The Ratio and Root Tests

Now I want to bring out with two tests that will tell us about absolute convergence or (unconditional) divergence of an infinite series \sum_{k=0}^\infty a_k. As such they’ll tell us nothing about conditionally convergent series.

First is the ratio test. We take the ratio of one term in the series to the previous one and define the limits superior and inferior

\displaystyle R=\limsup\limits_{n\rightarrow\infty}\left|\frac{a_{n+1}}{a_n}\right|
\displaystyle r=\liminf\limits_{n\rightarrow\infty}\left|\frac{a_{n+1}}{a_n}\right|

Now if R<1 then the series converges absolutely. If r>1 then the series diverges. But if r\leq1\leq R the test fails and we get no result.

In the first case, pick x to be a number so that R<x<1. Then there is some N so that x is an upper bound for the sequence of ratios past N. For large enough n, this means

\displaystyle\left|\frac{a_{n+1}}{a_n}\right|<x=\frac{x^{n+1}}{x^n}

and so

\displaystyle\frac{\left|a_{n+1}\right|}{x^{n+1}}<\frac{\left|a_n\right|}{x^n}\leq\frac{\left|a_N\right|}{x^N}

Now if we set c=\frac{\left|a_N\right|}{x^N}, this tells us that |a_n|\leq cx^n. Then the comparison test with the geometric series tells us that \sum_{k=0}^\infty\left|a_k\right| converges.

On the other hand, if r>1 then eventually \left|a_{n+1}\right|>\left|a_n\right|, so the terms of the series are getting bigger and bigger and bigger. But this would throw a monkey wrench into Cauchy’s condition for convergence of the series.

As for the root test, we will consider the sequence \sqrt[n]{\left|a_n\right|} and define

\displaystyle\rho=\limsup\limits_{n\rightarrow\infty}\sqrt[n]{\left|a_n\right|}

If \rho<1 then the series converges absolutely. If \rho>1 then the series diverges. And if \rho=1 the test is inconclusive.

In the first case, as we did for the ratio test, pick x so that \rho<x<1. Then above some N we have \left|a_n\right|<x^n and the comparison test works straight away. On the other hand, if \rho>1 then \left|a_n\right|>1 infinitely often, and Cauchy’s criterion falls apart again.

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May 5, 2008 - Posted by | Analysis, Calculus

5 Comments »

  1. [...] ratio and root tests are basically proven by comparing series of norms with geometric series. Since once we take the [...]

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  2. [...] tool here is the root test. We take the th root of the size of the th term in the series to find . Then we can pull the [...]

    Pingback by Convergence of Power Series « The Unapologetic Mathematician | August 29, 2008 | Reply

  3. [...] we can apply the root test again. The terms are now . Since the first radical expression goes to , the limit superior is the [...]

    Pingback by Derivatives of Power Series « The Unapologetic Mathematician | September 17, 2008 | Reply

  4. [...] use the ratio test to calculate the radius of convergence. We [...]

    Pingback by The Taylor Series of the Exponential Function « The Unapologetic Mathematician | October 7, 2008 | Reply

  5. this is an good websit because it can heilp students who dont konw how to do ratios

    Comment by lilroy | December 11, 2008 | Reply


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